Comparison of the effect of topical application of Eugenia caryophylata extract and topical diclofenac in primary knee osteoarthritis: a clinical trial study

Document Type : Original Article

Authors

1 Medical Plants Research Center, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, I.R. Iran

2 Student, Student Research Committee, Medical Plants Research Center, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, I.R. Iran.

Abstract

Background and aims: osteoarthritis is one of the most common arthritis in elderly. we evaluated to compare the effect of topical application of Eugenia caryophylata extract and topical diclofenac in primary knee osteoarthritis. Methods: This randomized double-blind clinical trial study was carried out upon 105 patients with primary knee osteoarthritis. Patients were selected randomly and divided into three groups of 35(diclofenac) and 35 (Eugenia caryophylata) and 35(placebo).The first group was given three times diclofenac 1% of one mg, the second group was given topical caryophylata 10% of one mg three times daily and third group was given placebo 1 mg three times daily. For three groups, WOMAC questionnaire (overall pain, knee pain, morning stiffness, stiffness during day, physical activity ) were completed pretreatment, one week and three and four weeks post-treatment. Findings: The findings indicated that there is a significant decrease in overall pain (p=o.oo5), stiffness during day (p=0.001), morning stiffness (p=0.001) and knee pain (p=0.017) and physical activity (p=0.001) in four weeks after the initiation of treatment in three groups of topical Eugenia caryophylata, diclofenac and placebo . In all the three groups, mean overall score of womac questionnaire was significantly decreased .no side effects related to the intake of medication in three groups was observed. Conclusion: Extract of Eugenia caryophylata is effective in decreasing knee pain, morning stiffness, and stiffness during day and improvement of physical activity in patients with knee osteoarthritis and it can be used alongside of chemical medication to reduce symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

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